Holy Week Devo – 7

Saturday, April 11th

What was happening on Saturday?

The body of Jesus was entombed.

Jesus Is Buried Luke 23:50-56

And a man named Joseph, who was a member of the Council, a good and righteous man (he had not consented to their plan and action), a man from Arimathea, a city of the Jews, who was waiting for the kingdom of God; this man went to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus. And he took it down and wrapped it in a linen cloth and laid Him in a tomb cut into the rock, where no one had ever lain. It was the preparation day, and the Sabbath was about to begin. Now the women who had come with Him out of Galilee followed and saw the tomb and how His body was laid. Then they returned and prepared spices and perfumes. And on the Sabbath, they rested according to the commandment.

Three Thoughts…

Was it Really Three Days and Nights?

According to Christian tradition, Jesus died on Good Friday at 3pm (or, the ninth hour of the day according to Matthew 27:45-46; Mark 15:33-34; and Luke 23:44). By 6pm He was entombed and then on Sunday at dawn, Jesus rose from the dead. That’s approximately 36 hours. Yet, according to Matthew 12:40, Jesus said, “For, just as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the great fish, so will the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.” So, what’s up with that?

First-century Palestine didn’t begin new days at midnight like we do in our 21st-century cultural context. For them, it was sundown, which the Jewish people still practice. In first-century Judaism, part of a day counted as a whole day. So, because Jesus was buried on Friday evening and rose on Sunday morning, He was in the tomb “three days and three nights.” The authors of the Gospels all point to the resurrection occurring at dawn on the first day of the week (for them it was Sunday). So, it was the beginning of a new day—both literally as well as symbolically!

What Was Happening Between the Cross and the Empty Tomb?

After Jesus’s human body died on the cross, Jesus descended into death. Death did indeed capture Jesus and He entered into it fully. We read in Luke 23:43 that Jesus told the humble criminal who was crucified next to Him that, “Today you shall be with Me in Paradise.” We also read in the Apostles Creed that, “He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried; he descended to hell.” So, what was happening on this Holy Saturday? There are no specific scriptural references, but many have attempted to answer the question by examining many of the Messianic prophecies in the Old Testament (mostly those contained in Psalms) and what the New Testament records. My own thoughts are probably too simplistic for well-studied theologians, yet my current thinking is that Jesus did descend into hell, but not to continue His suffering. John was there as Jesus died on the cross and he records Jesus saying, “It is finished!” (John 19:30). My thoughtful speculation is that Jesus went into hell to seize the keys of death and hell from Satan. In Revelation 1:18, the risen Christ appears to John and declares, [I am] “the living One; and I was dead, and behold, I am alive forevermore, and I have the keys of death and of Hades.” After seizing the keys of death and hell Jesus took them to His Father in Paradise—and returned to the tomb for resurrection.

Sabbath Rest

Luke 23:56b: And on the Sabbath, they rested according to the commandment. On Holy Saturday we wait. It’s a Sabbath Day, and as such, a time of quiet and restful reflection. That first Holy Saturday was anything but restful for the disciples of Jesus. There was much anxiety, fear, and depression. These emotions are processed best in prayer and thoughtful reflection.

Author GK. Chesterton in “The Everlasting Man” writes that this Sabbath “was the last Sabbath of the old creation, which was marred by Adam’s sin…What [the disciples] were looking at on Sunday morning, was the first day of a new creation, with a new heaven and a new earth; and in a semblance of the gardener God walked again in the garden, in the cool not of the evening but the dawn.”[1]

Thoughtful and reflective: Andrew Peterson “Resurrection Letters: One Album, Ten Years” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kx3vDBtf78E&list=PLSOArt-wtjbDxjvTK9gO62ok2EIdqZX2g

 

 

[1] G.K. Chesterton: The Everlasting Man, Part Two, Chap. III.

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